Tag Archives: Mom

Summer of Suck 2.0 – Part Four: Tedium

As I started telling you in Part Three, the tedious part of addressing my adrenal tumor started to sink in during the days following my initial diagnosis.

Taking a subway-to-the-bus just to go to the hospital or to Dr. E’s office. Going home or to the office from there is even more awkward.

subway 20121105_091319

Walking to the lone CVS in my neighborhood, wondering why it’s one of the few places in all of NYC that doesn’t deliver.

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All these terrible anniversaries

I knew to dread Christmas. Because obviously, Mom and my first Christmas without Dad would be hard. My body created a buffer of sorts: I was sick in bed with bronchitis for three days beginning Christmas Eve, leaving Mom to fend for herself. I was so ill I couldn’t even feel guilty until later.

Christmas circa 1978 20150909_203232

I anticipated that the month of February would be painful between Valentine’s Day and Mom’s birthday. Dad was a romantic who enjoyed planning surprises for his wife and took pride in his gift giving.

I had no idea how painful my birthday would be. The first October 16 without Dad in this world, how it hurt. I was heartbroken all over again. Continue reading

I am a monster

My mother is crying.

I am sitting with my arms around her in a gesture meant to comfort, but it’s a perfunctory effort. My arms may as well be made of wood, and my heart, of stone.

It’s February and we are in Florida, attempting to celebrate my mother’s first birthday without Dad. Mom is raw and unsteady. As brittle and delicate as a fallen leaf. When I arrive at the airport, I hug her and try to find the right thing to say. Saying the wrong thing, even a sincere “how are you?” brings her to tears some days. But my own eyes stay dry.

I am a terrible daughter.


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I’m going to Italy. Where should I eat?

My mother and I are going to Italy in a few months.


Yep. It’s going to be…interesting.

Mom and Jen

She doesn’t find me funny (at all) and we tend to bicker. But we’re going via a tour – an upscale tour that will hopefully spare me from embarrassing Americans asking for embarrassing American things – so there will be other people to hang out with when we get on each other’s nerves. Hopefully Mom will make at least one friend to hang out with when she gets annoyed with me (and so I can sneak away for a nap!).

Our tour has a few meal gaps. While I can certainly Google, I would love to arrive in Italy armed with personal suggestions. Continue reading

I wish

I wish one of you would go to the grocery store with me to physically prevent me from buying the avocados I never seem to eat before they rot.

pee wee


I wish this great Modern Love column had told us more about the hitchhiker. WHAT HAPPENED?! Continue reading

My totally lousy Christmas (and not for the reasons I expected)

I had never thought to make a list of questions I don’t want to be asked in the presence of my mother. That is, not until my mother took me to a hometown ER for the first time in my adult life this past Saturday.

Upon my arrival in triage, the ER nurse spoke.

“What is your weight? Please step on the scale.”



I wobbled in that direction–partly from illness, mostly from dread. I had been sick for about three days, but unfortunately my appetite for Christmas cookies was unaffected. My weight, a number carefully hidden from Mom, would soon be revealed. Continue reading

Last Christmas

As Adrienne, Christina and I walked through the crowded Union Square holiday market, I cracked a terrible joke. We’d just had brunch at Javelina. Maybe it was the margarita.


Remembering the money I spent last Christmas on gifts for Dad at that same market, I asked “think I can get my money back?” before mumbling “gallows humor.”

It probably wasn’t funny to my friends and if anything, I might have made them uncomfortable. Fortunately the subject was changed for us as the hordes of Christmas shoppers pushed us through the market like leaves floating in a strong current.

Briefly separated, I was left thinking about how different this Christmas will be without my sweet Dad.

Last Christmas, I went to one of Dad’s doctor’s appointments with him and my mother. He seemed to be doing well and proudly posed in front of a hospital sign featuring his terrific specialist. Dad’s breathing was pretty good and he was able to walk longer distances than he had in recent history. I was thrilled.


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